Juneteenth – 151 Years.

Last year, I marked Juneteenth for the first time on MetaCookbook. I have no intention of letting the day slip by ever again. As a twitter friend said, it’s as American a holiday as exists.

But, as with last year, I mostly want to encourage everyone to read something more about it. This year a greatly educational read for me was What is Juneteenth?. A bit more history, and some good comments on what other days would be reasonable to celebrate the end of legalized slavery in this country. And why 19 June remains appealing.… Continue reading →

Cornbread, Culinary History, and Other Monday Bites.

While I knew some folks were adamant about cornbread having sugar in it, or not, I had no idea this divide actually largely broke down along racial lines. “It’s actually a gauge of who gets to call what’s Southern ‘Southern.’” says Micheal Twitty of Afroculinaria when discussing the greater layers to the cornbread debate. Me? I grew up on Jiffy Mix, and so I guess that makes me a lover of sweet cornbead. Not that I’ve ever had cornbread made from white corn…

Never have I been more interested to read a book about someone I’ve never heard about before. If anyone would like to book club The Civil Wars of Julia Ward Howe with me, please let me know! (Also, tell me if you’ve heard of her before!) That would likely prompt me to purchase it sooner than later.… Continue reading →

Mostly History Links

I’ve never been inclined toward historical activities. For example, Society for Creative Anacronism was a huge hobby of a number of my friends in college, but it never appealed to me. I never took history electives in school. I thought I understood the proverbs “those who forget history are doomed to repeat it” and “history is written by the winners,” but over the years, I have come to understand how much I did not and do not fully grasp them. I’ve also learned that school history is some watered-down, whitewashed bullshit and history is way more interesting (if also more traumatic at times) than what I learned in school. So, with that in mind, I present today’s “blather” links. Including, for good measure, one interesting present-day link that might be relevant to how today will be “history” in thirty years.… Continue reading →

Food Links for a Monday

Almost 10 years ago, the oldest known cookbook written (in 1866) by a free black woman was unearthed at University of Michigan. The next oldest Black cookbook that historians know of wasn’t published for another fifteen years, in 1881. That historical rareness, it turns out, isn’t merely an artifact of earlier times. It’s the norm; very few cookbooks written by black authors have been published over the years. Making the past two months (Sept and Oct) “anomalous” in having six cookbooks released by black women in that time. This link is an interesting one that discusses such history in greater depth, and touches on current reality, including mentioning my perennial favorite, Angela Davis of Kitchenista Diaries.

“Ecosystems all around the world are warming up due to global climate change, says Pershing, but the Gulf of Maine is ahead of the curve.… Continue reading →

Juneteenth

Note: Starting tomorrow, our nephew is visiting for the next 10 days, so this blog will be silent for his visit.

Today is Juneteenth. The celebration of the end of America’s era of slavery, as on 19 June 1865, slaves in Texas, the last remaining enslaved people, were publicly declared legally free. This year is the 150th anniversary of this momentous and fabulous event.

If you grew up in a way or place where the existence of this holiday is news to you, as I did, please go read about it. The Wikipedia article linked above is interesting and informational, and the holiday is important. Especially in light of what has and has not changed in 150 years.

Black lives matter.… Continue reading →